Research in Brief

Female Legislators and the Tipping Point for Female Centered Policy

Research shows that, as the percentage of female legislators increases, the likelihood of the state instituting welfare sanctions decreases.

District of Change: Gentrification and Demographic Trends in Washington, DC

A study of household migration behavior in DC reveals long-term regional effects of gentrification.

Stop, Children, What’s That Sound? The Unintended Consequences of Police Contact on Juveniles

Study finds that “stop, question, and frisk” interactions between juveniles and police lead to an enhanced likelihood of future youth delinquency.

Into Sub-Saharan Africa: Spillover Effects of China’s Economic Boom Through Trade

China’s domestic investment activities prove as strong stimulus to direct trade expansion for its partners in Africa.

The Welfare Investment: How Child Sponsorship Is Tied to Future Education and Employment

Children participating in an international sponsorship program are more likely to attain higher education and formal employment.

Creating Self-Enforcing Democracy: Fraud, Protest, and the Role of International Observers

The presence of international elections observers may discourage both election fraud and “sore loser” protests.

Scaling Back Quantitative Easing: Domestic Recovery at a Foreign Cost

Federal Reserve announcements about “tapering,” or reducing the level of quantitative easing, had significant negative impacts on financial asset prices in otherwise robust emerging market economies.

Does a Wife Shortage in China Mean More Crime Too?

The authors of a new study look at the excess of single men due to the marriage market and gender imbalance in China as a cause of an increase in crime.

Raise the Roof: Comparing Cost Savings from Efficient Roof Upgrades

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers compare the 50-year net savings for white and “green” (vegetated) roofs, which are displacing conventional black roofs in the US building sector.

It’s Getting Hot in Here, Now I’m a Climate Change Believer

A series of studies demonstrates why people use trends in local weather and temperature, rather than statistically relevant global climate patterns, to construct their beliefs about climate change.