Research in Brief

What’s Race Got to Do With It? The Relationship Between Race and Health Outcomes in Segregated Neighborhoods

New research finds that race and ethnicity are important mechanisms through which neighborhood segregation affects self-rated health.

The Cost of Wind Energy: Tradeoffs between Energy Storage and Transmission

New research finds that transmission costs must be at least $600/MW-km and energy storage must cost at most $100/kW h in order for wind energy storage to be economical.

No Gains From Good Governance?: Why Foreign Companies Opt Out of Strict Regulatory Practices

Foreign companies that cross-list on US stock exchanges can make substantial financial gains from adopting US corporate governance practices yet firms overwhelmingly choose to opt out, suggesting substantial private opportunity costs from stricter regulations.

Do you want a higher minimum wage with that?

This classic study of fast food restaurants challenged economic orthodoxy on the minimum wage.

Paradox of Subsidy: Could Biofuel subsidies be increasing CO2 emissions?

A new study finds that biofuel subsidies from 1981-2011 paradoxically may have led to the increase in oil production and greenhouse gas emissions.

How Message Framing Can Help Explain Energy User Motivations

Targeted message framing can help increase participation in and understanding of energy efficient programs provided by utility companies and government subsidies, which are largely unknown by residents.

High Quality Vocab Cues from Parents Predict Better Comprehension Among Their Children

Children who received higher quality vocabulary cues from their parents are found to have higher vocabulary comprehension scores than those whose parents gave lower quality cues.

Another Path: Can school-based gang prevention programs show youth a way out?

An evaluation of the G.R.E.A.T. program, implemented as a school-based response to gang activity among youths, finds that students enrolled in the program are less likely than their peers to join gangs or have negative attitudes towards the police.

Save Money, Live Better? The Urban Carbon Emissions of Wal-Mart

Ongoing research suggests that the economic decisions that Wal-Mart makes may result in the optimization of its energy consumption and in turn a reduction in its carbon emissions.

A Different Kind of ‘Green’ Motivation in Environmental Campaigns

A three-part experiment demonstrates how, in some situations, campaigns using environmental and social appeals may be more effective than traditional economic appeals in producing positive behavior changes.