Research in Brief

The Cost-effectiveness of Texting to Nudge Students Towards College Matriculation

A $7-per-student text messaging intervention during the summer following high school graduation significantly increased college enrollment rates in the fall, underscoring the returns to behavioral interventions.

DIY Urban Design: community improvement or an act of crime?

Do-It-Yourself Urban Design occurs when people make unauthorized changes to public space to address local needs. Sociologist Gordon Douglas discusses the benefits—and potential unintended costs—that follow when self-appointed urban planners take direct action to improve their communities.

#TextsfromHillary

#TextsfromHillary was an Internet sensation in 2012, reaching its zenith with contributions from the Secretary of State herself. This article explores how memes and the culture of post-feminism both elevate and diminish women in politics.

Are genetically modified crops a health risk?

Public debate about genetically modified crops misses the fact that a preponderance of scientific studies show GM foods to be safe to consume. Where risks do exist, they are no different than those found in non-GM crops.

No Pomp, All Circumstance: How Changing the College Experience Could Close the Higher Education Gap

There is a staggering gap between low- and middle-income students in college completion rates. New research indicates that the key to closing this gap may be focusing on helping first-generation students develop “school-relevant selves.”

Grandma Retires: How a New Grandchild Changes a Woman’s Career Choices

A new study analyzes the effects of a new grandchild on a grandmother’s labor force participation and attempts to connect caring for grandchildren with retirement choices.

Who’s in Charge? The Impact of Greater Principal Autonomy on Student Test Scores

In a recent article published in Education Finance and Policy, Matthew P. Steinberg examines the impact of greater principal autonomy on student test scores in Chicago.

Closing the private school enrollment gap: Are education vouchers enough?

Variations in parental education and income explain most of the ethnic, racial, and immigrant differences in private school attendance.

Why Inclusive Zones are Not Inclusive Everywhere

Research from New York University explains why inclusive housing policies work better in some places than in others.

Should No Child Left Behind Be Reauthorized? The Impact of Accountability Pressure on Teachers and Students

A recent study in the American Economic Journal is the first to look at the impact of No Child Left Behind incentives on teachers and students nationwide.