Research in Brief

Medicare Beneficiaries More Likely to Switch Away from Managed Care

A new study finds that high-cost Medicare beneficiaries are more likely to switch from private Medicare Advantage plans to original Medicare plans.

Are Gayborhoods Driving Economic Growth in US Cities?

A study finds that US cities with significant concentrations of gay men have seen more rapid economic development of their downtown neighborhoods in recent years.

ABC, It’s as Easy as 1 2 3: Parents as Early Teachers

New research shows that parental incentives for child development can yield large gains in both cognitive and non-cognitive domains for young children.

Questioning Smart Urbanism: Is Data-Driven Governance a Panacea?

Smart urbanism based on real-time data analysis is not a panacea for all city management problems. The numerous benefits come with potential risks in city failure.

Does Merit-Based Financial Aid Reduce the Number of STEM Graduates?

Although ensuring access of talented individuals to higher education is of great importance, there is evidence that suggests that merit-based financial aid reduces the number of graduates in STEM fields, one of the main drivers of innovation and, thus, of economic growth.

Economic downturns: Bad for your wallet, good for your health?

A recent study confirms the finding that mortality rates decrease during recessions and that severe recessions produce even larger reductions in mortality rates.

What’s Dragging Down the Asian Economy? A New Look at Determinants of Growth

Researchers find that private and public investments, lower financial risk, and flexible exchange rate regimes appear to support the economic growth of Asian countries, while more open capital accounts marginally reduce growth.

Open for Innovation: How Does Open Innovation Impact National Laboratories?

Open innovation has an impact on both scientific and technological innovation on the national laboratory level through links with industry, international collaboration, and the employment of non-permanent staff.

If You Build It, They Won’t Come: Why Eliminating Food Deserts Won’t Close the Nutrition Gap

A recent study finds that nutritional differences across socioeconomic groups are not well explained by access to healthy foods.

A Tale of Two Turnout Functions: Effects of Development on Voter Turnout across Countries

New research finds evidence that development, compulsory voting laws, and decisiveness of elections have distinct effects in developed and developing countries.