Research in Brief

Predatory War or Preventive War? Two New Theories about Why States Fight against Terrorism

Despite the high cost and perceived ineffectiveness of fighting terrorism, countries must do so in order to preserve their sovereignty, legitimacy, and territorial integrity.

Good Neighbors: Addressing Race in Public Housing Integration

New research shows that perceived racial conflict is hindering the ability of black, public housing residents to integrate into predominantly white neighborhoods, an issue that the City of Chicago is doing nothing to address.

From Farm to Trashcan, America’s Food Supply Is Being Squandered: A Look At Consumer Attitudes

Researchers find that framing messages about food waste in terms of potential cost savings for consumers can be more effective than mentioning threats to the environment.

Rivalry among Criminal Organizations Is One of the Most Serious Threats to Free Press in Mexico

A study notes that the presence of profitable criminal organizations does not necessarily lead to higher levels of violence towards journalists, but rivalry among competing organizations does.

Do Democrats Always Spend More on Science Funding?

Contrary to popular perceptions, Democrats do not always spend more than Republicans on R&D.

Medicare Beneficiaries More Likely to Switch Away from Managed Care

A new study finds that high-cost Medicare beneficiaries are more likely to switch from private Medicare Advantage plans to original Medicare plans.

Are Gayborhoods Driving Economic Growth in US Cities?

A study finds that US cities with significant concentrations of gay men have seen more rapid economic development of their downtown neighborhoods in recent years.

ABC, It’s as Easy as 1 2 3: Parents as Early Teachers

New research shows that parental incentives for child development can yield large gains in both cognitive and non-cognitive domains for young children.

Questioning Smart Urbanism: Is Data-Driven Governance a Panacea?

Smart urbanism based on real-time data analysis is not a panacea for all city management problems. The numerous benefits come with potential risks in city failure.

Does Merit-Based Financial Aid Reduce the Number of STEM Graduates?

Although ensuring access of talented individuals to higher education is of great importance, there is evidence that suggests that merit-based financial aid reduces the number of graduates in STEM fields, one of the main drivers of innovation and, thus, of economic growth.